Categories
Media Theory Reviews

2019 Existentially Reviewed

I originally wrote this in early January but decided to shelve it because this post felt too personal and off-topic for a blog (mostly) about post production. What a difference eleven weeks can make, right? I don’t have anything to say about the ongoing global pandemic, but something about this post feels of the moment and worth sharing now.


In 2019 my wife gave birth to our second child and I became a father again. Parenthood is amazing, and beautiful. But that’s not what this post is about, because being a parent is also an endeavor filled with an existential anxiety best expressed by a quote from Elizabeth Stone:

“Making the decision to have a child – it is momentous. It is to decide forever to have your heart go walking around outside your body.”

It is through this lens of existential anxiety brought on by parenthood that I want to share with you my three favorite pieces of media from 2019: The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells, Inside Bill’s Brain by David Guggenheim, and Exhalation: Stories by Ted Chiang.


“Forget your hopes. They are what brought you here.”

— Clive James translating Dante

If you think you know what Wallace-Well’s book is about without having read it, you’re wrong! The Uninhabitable Earth is to climate change, as The Omnivore’s Dilemma was to food: a framework to think about its respective topic and a survey of the best thinking in the field.

Just as Michael Pollan set out to explore the complex multi-faceted ways in which we grow and consume food from fast-food to farm-to-table; David Wallace-Well examines all of the ways our climate is changing (rising sea-levels, reduced air quality, more extreme weather, etc) and more importantly, how we as a species are coping with it. His chapter on how Cognitive Biases prevent us from effectively grasping the problem is a worthwhile reason to read this book.

I don’t know how to come to terms with the fact that my children may very well live to see a world where humans abandon coastal cities like Miami and Venice. But neither do I know how to reconcile how much I love my kids with how much I dislike people. Humans aren’t good at much, but we are certainly good at holding opposing values as equally true.


“Seat thyself sultanically among the moons of Saturn, and take high abstracted man alone; and he seems a wonder, a grandeur, and a woe. But from the same point, take mankind in mass, and for the most part, they seem a mob of unnecessary duplicates, both contemporary and hereditary.”

— Herman Melville, Moby Dick

David Guggenheim frames his wonderful portrait of the brilliant Bill Gates through the work he and his wife, Melinda, are accomplishing through their foundation. Let’s just get this out of the way: Guggenheim tries to paint Gates as complex, but his documentary series is really an indictment against the rest of us. Bill and Melinda Gates want to give us clean water and eradicate polio, and they are willing to spend Billions of dollars to do it, but people just can’t stop being people. We reject the vaccines and the cheap clean energy and good money continually gets thrown after bad.

Watching the Netflix documentary series made me feel two things: firstly, Bill Gates was born a genius and was given every opportunity to succeed. His success doesn’t feel like much of an achievement as it does an inevitability; it would have been reprehensible had his life turned out any other way.

Secondly, that most all of humanity has relinquished so much power to so few makes me feel sad for the future. We, the people, no longer believe that government can do something like eradicate polio through smart public policy, so instead we wait for billionaire overlords to hand out a disease free future when they feel like it. Because as much as Bill Gates wants to help humanity, he’d prefer not to pay more taxes.


“What need is there to weep over parts of life? The whole of it calls for tears.”

— Seneca

The wisest of us know that if there is any comfort to be found in this world, it is to be found in art. Ted Chiang’s recently published collection of short stories Exhalation are transcendent. “The Merchant and the Alchemist’s Gate” and “Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom” are beautiful explorations of regret and the triumph over it.

But in my opinion, the best of Chiang’s short stories is, “The Great Silence,” about the parrots who live next to the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico and lamet humanity’s inability to see what’s right under their nose. It’s heartrendingly beautiful and is the perfect coda to a post about existential dread. If you only read one of my links, go to Electric Lit and read his story here.

Categories
Software

Avid’s lame COVID-19 response

When Avid announced that they were assisting editing professionals shift to remote workflows by offering 90 licenses I was hopeful. But after reading the details, all Avid did was make a difficult situation harder.

Avid is only offering temporary duplicate licenses. I manage a team of 18 people, so this is what I’d have to do to take advantage of Avid’s ‘help’:

  1. Get everyone on my team to sign up for a “My Avid” Account.
  2. Gather everyone’s account user names into a spreadsheet.
  3. Coordinate which license each user is using with my Post House.
  4. Email all of this information to Avid.
  5. Wait for Avid to do whatever it does.

As if I didn’t have enough to do pivoting our team to remote.

The ‘Right’ Solution

Instead of creating more work for their users, Avid could simply make their software free for 90 days. Period.

Look at Affinity software’s response:

That’s why we’ve put in place three new measures which we hope will help at least some of you out there. These are:

+A new 90-day free trial of the Mac and Windows versions of the whole Affinity suite

+A 50% discount for those who would rather buy and keep the apps on Mac, Windows PC and iPad

+A pledge to engage more than 100 freelance creatives for work, spending the equivalent of our annual commissioning budget in the next three months (more details of this will be announced soon).

Instead of creating more work, imagine if when you fired up Media Composer the launch screen looked like this:

No worrying about duplicate licenses. No spread sheets or My Avid accounts. Just full featured software free for 90 days.

Categories
People

Producers on Producing Post Production Part 3

If editing is consider “the invisible art,” then the men and women who supervise a film or television show’s post production process are a part of something even more arcane and misunderstood.

Producers who specialize in post production can go by an assortment of titles: Post Producer, Post Production Supervisor, Co-Producer, or even Associate Producer. No matter the title, they all have one thing in common, they are vital to the smooth day-to-day operation of the post production process.

To give you an understanding of how versatile the job is I interviewed four Producers working in a variety of genres to hear in their own words how they think about their work. Over the next three months I’ll be sharing excerpts of our conversations.

What’s presented here is a compilation.

Part 3 Resumes, Hiring, and the Future of Post

Post Producers are usually responsible for hiring Coordinators, Production Assistants, Editors, and even Assistant Editors. Since many resumes cross their desks, I thought it was worth asking them about how to make a resume standout and how to engage in the interviewing process.

Gobler

What advice would you give to someone who is looking to break in, or like a P.A. who’s kind of in but looking to grow their career? 

Danylevich

If growth is the goal, chase down the most difficult jobs you can. There’s no other way I would’ve been able to move into post producing after being on a show for two years. There’s no way. So, where it may be uncomfortable, it may seem crazy, that’s definitely like an opportunity for growth, if you look at it through a different lens. As far as specific career advice, I would say the mindset of no task being beneath you is really important. Even when I was post producing I was helping vendors lay cable and drill holes in walls in New York and that’s definitely not a typical post producer job. Typically you’re not handling physical equipment like that. It’s down to making sure the Showrunner has a specific type of water that he wants on the mixed stage. So it’s all the big picture stuff and also like the small stuff that makes a difference. I’d say don’t be afraid of leaning into the discomfort. We’re all human it’s supposed to be an uncomfortable journey if you’re really comfortable you’re probably not going to grow. And don’t don’t let your ego get in the way of doing tasks that you might otherwise think are beneath you.

Gobler 

And when you interview and hire post supervisors and post coordinators, what are some of the qualities that you look for? 

Phelps  

I look for somebody who’s flexible, because post changes every single day. So somebody who’s flexible and adaptable, as well as detail oriented. Those are the biggest things. I think post is pretty black and white. Personally, I think deliverables are deliverables, specs are specs, frame rates are frame rates, codecs are codecs, but what is most important is having somebody who can handle pressure and change every single day, with ease. 

Gobler  

And how do you uncover those things in your process? Is it something that you look for in a resume? Or, something that you look for in an interview? 

Phelps  

Resumes are hard. You don’t really get a lot from resumes. I want to meet somebody because I’m intrigued by a resume. But it really comes down to a recommendation and meeting with the person. I look at body language during an interview to see how nervous somebody is. I also look at how somebody talks about specs, because specs can be very nerve wracking for a lot of people, or codecs, or cameras. When somebody handles it with ease, that’s kind of how I determine if I think somebody can handle it, because, to me, it’s not that scary, but for a lot of people it can be scary. I don’t expect anyone to know everything, it’s impossible, but somebody who’s willing to learn and dig in.

Gobler 

And, before you mentioned that when you look at an intriguing resume it makes you want to meet with someone. What is an intriguing résumr? Do you have any examples or stories of something that you saw that caught your eye? 

Phelps 

I like when people put icons on their resume. It’s not often I see icons but if they are familiar with AVID I think that’s really key. Post supervisors don’t need to know AVID in a technical sense — that’s why we have AE’s — but I learned to Supervise on an AVID, so I look for somebody who values knowing Photoshop, knowing AVID, knowing After Effects, knowing Media Encoder, any of the programs because that shows me that they’re technical. And, if they have a little icon on it I think it makes it fun. 

Gobler 

It’s interesting that you don’t see very many technical post supervisors. Right? 

Phelps 

Yeah, I do not. I think post supervisors can be technical, but I don’t see a lot of them and sometimes I think they’re a little shy from it and they have AEs. If you have really good AEs they take care of all of your post needs from ingest to delivery, and you have editors around you, but I think it’s really important for me to: a) understand how long something takes, so that I can respect somebody’s time; b) understand what’s involved in that, so I understand what I’m asking someone to do, because I don’t believe in asking somebody to do something that I have no understanding of. And so I look for those qualities because I think a post sup who comes in and isn’t afraid to sit down in a bay, and troubleshoot with an AE, and have some input, is valuable.

Gobler 

What do you look for when you’re hiring? 

Stevenson 

Ok, so first of all, this is just saying it’s not a recommendation, because obviously with a recommendation from someone I respect I’m going to look at them no matter what. So if it’s just someone blindly that I don’t know, with no recommendation I look first at how their resumé is structured. Does it look organized and readable? Because if it’s got weird mistakes, and weird typefaces, and looks really odd, I’m gonna think how organized is this person? How does this person’s mind work? Do they have an organized mind? Or do they have a mind that’s all over the place? 

Then the next thing I’m going to look at is what their experience is and where did they go to school? If they don’t have a lot of experience, I want to know where they go to school? What did they study? Do they have a degree? I know there’s a lot of people that don’t have degrees but there’s also a lot to be said for completing a college degree and the type of critical thinking that you learn in college. And so if I had a choice between two people with the same experience, and one had a college degree in anything, I would choose that over the other person, just because, if all things were equal, that person would have that extra bit. I knew that they worked hard to get their degree. They know how to think and how to deal with situations.

I’d like to know that they had some kind of other jobs too. Even if you’ve been a barista or some other customer service jobs it shows that you know how to work with people. That you have some experience working out in the world, not just on some student films you’ve never had a job. And then of course when you bring them in for an interview, I just want to know can we work together. Can we get along. I always weigh in, even on the PA’s. I know some people just say to their coordinator, “just pick a PA who you like.” I like to weigh in on the whole thing to see how the whole picture is. It’s just do we connect as people? Can we get along? Are you organized? Do you want to be on this show? Why do you want to work on this show? And then just pick the best person for the job who’s also the best fit for: do we all get along? Can we work together? So there’s a certain amount of personality that goes into it.

Gobler 

When you look to hire people, is there anything that you look for? What’s your process? Let’s start with that. Anything you look for in resumes, or anything that you would look for in an interview. 

Holt 

Totally depends on the job. I think the common thing I look for is passion. I genuinely look for passion if I can try to find it because, to be honest, I made the joke about don’t get into post management. If you don’t like this it will not be fun. Especially post management. It’s not the most thankful job in the world. And the hours aren’t banker hours. So if you don’t like this, you will be miserable and seek opportunities outside of our entertainment world. But I would just recommend that you have this passion and you love working on the shows, you love working with people. So that is the first thing I look for.

It’s hard to assess this in interviews but, you can generally find out through either recommendations, or you can sort of gauge in interviews, but it’s work ethic. And I think that comes from passion. When you’re passionate about what you do you’ll work long hours and it won’t be work. I’m not saying you have to work long hours. I’d say the best people in the world I know could work for hours and get the job done better than some people work in 12. So I’m totally fine with that. If you are excellent at your job, if you can do that show and it only takes you four a day, Godspeed. Good for you. I’d love to find you because I would put you on two shows. Great, and you can make double money. That’s sort of the nature of my business now. So I’m looking for the passion. I think it really transcends almost everything else. 

Then general talkability. I think I got this advice. This is a good quote. When I was working with Kevin Smith I got this advice from him. We were gonna do a pitch. He was going to do a pitch to Netflix and I was helping him produce a show, and I had not worked with him because we were doing all of his feature films but I was really more of the TV guy, and they were gonna do the TV show. They brought me in and so I started spinning off all of my credits and he like stopped me. He’s like, “I’m assuming that if you’re in front of me that you’re qualified to do the job. I just want to know if I want to hang out with you for eight hours a day.” I was like “Oh, fair enough. Fair enough.” I think that is a level on which we also tend to overlook sometimes. If you are going to work eight plus hours on a Saturday together, I hope you like each other. I hope you have a genuine ability to get along. I think that’s really important.

I wrapped up each conversation by asking where they saw the future of post production going.

Gobler

Let’s start to work towards a conclusion by talking about the future of post-production. In terms of your thoughts about where you see the business going.

Danylevich 

I actually just had an interesting conversation with a good friend of mine who is a VFX Supervisor that I’ve been working closely with for over a decade.  Like with everything else in our economy, there’s so much automation happening. So one thing that he said he was really looking forward to is how some of the more tedious stuff that is in visual effects is going to start getting automated like Roto. So I think that’s something that we’re probably going to start seeing sooner rather than later. And in some ways that’s really good in the sense that we’re not going to have to try to manage artists that are in India, but it also means that a whole workforce is going to need to find new jobs which is always the double edged sword. 

Gobler

And there’s also an element of “Today’s miracle is tomorrow’s expectation.”

Danylevich

Oh I mean my God! Yeah I mean that’s how the show was where every single time we made the impossible happen it sort of became the normal. It’s like “it’s no longer impossible you made it happen. So now that’s the expectation.” Absolutely. I think that’s the most challenging aspect of post-production, and we’re seeing it everywhere with visual effects. Everything is becoming more and more ambitious and so the expectation is more and more ambitious and it’s anyone’s fault.

Gobler 

The future of post, where is it going? How is it going to change in the next 10 years? 

Stevenson 

That’s always the big question. They talk about 8K but I can’t even perceive that. But I feel like the manufacturers of the equipment and the software are gonna want to keep pushing the envelope even if the naked eye can’t even perceive it. But yeah it’s definitely gonna be file based. And I do worry about people trying to move up because things get so compartmentalized in jobs that especially with assistant editors and editors it’s almost like Assistant Editor shouldn’t even be called that anymore because they can’t necessarily even move up. At least in scripted. I mean they do move up but they’re expected to do so much. They’re expected to cut in sound effects and they’re cutting in… I mean it’s ridiculous. Just for a temp cut they have to cut music. So they’re doing editing work just to show the network a cut. And then also editing is set to be outsourced because people can do it anywhere. So then you wonder about Hollywood. Like how much of it is gonna be in Hollywood? Is this system gonna last? Is the union system gonna ultimately last? To a certain degree as long as editors are part of IATSE, you obviously you production people, but I kind of worry about going into the future. Is a lot of it gonna be outsourced? Because there are a lot of talented people worldwide that can do it remotely. So I feel like everybody, even people that want to get into post or move up have to have a plan B and Plan C about what else you’re gonna do if it’s outsourced.

Liz Lipschultz contributed to this interview.

Categories
Fiction

Briefly Noted: Robot’s Pet (fiction)

Robot’s Pet – In this short book of speculative poetry, the anonymous Lithuanian poet combines her childhood experience of living under authoritarian rule with our current anxieties surrounding job automation by imagining an ambiguously dystopian future where humans are kept as pets by robots. Removed from the drudgery of survival, humanity thrives under the new arrangement. When the nameless poet sings out, “What new worlds have I discovered now that I no longer worry about healthcare!” We want to be there too.

Categories
People

Producers on Producing Post Production – Part 2

If editing is considered “the invisible art,” then the men and women who supervise a film or television show’s post production process are a part of something even more arcane and misunderstood.

Producers who specialize in post production can go by an assortment of titles: Post Producer, Post Production Supervisor, Co-Producer, or even Associate Producer. No matter the title, they all have one thing in common, they are vital to the smooth day-to-day operation of the post production process.

To give you an understanding of how versatile the job is I interviewed four Producers working in a variety of genres to hear in their own words how they think about their work. Over the next three months I’ll be sharing excerpts of our conversations.

What’s presented here is a compilation.

Part 2: People Management

Post Producers and Post Supervisors manage the Post Coordinators, the Post P.A.’s, and often the Assistant Editors (collectively known as the support staff). Speaking to my peers I discovered that many see themselves as a career coach for a show’s most junior members. They give their team the opportunity to try new things, and protect them from making career-ending mistakes.

Although the role isn’t generally considered a ‘creative’ one, the depth and breadth of a successful Post Producer’s responsibilities, and their ability to establish the show’s operating style, exerts influence in a multitude of ways.

Gobler 

Shifting gears to people management; who do you manage? What kind of team do normally have? 

Danylevich 

So on The Orville we had a core post production team that by the end of the second season is myself and then our amazing Post Supervisor, Sabina. Then we had a Coordinator and two PA’s just to handle the amount of stuff that came up so that we could delegate. Then, even though I didn’t directly manage all of the people in the visual effects department, I did have to work very closely with the Visual Effects Producer.

I guess on a typical day I would start out with checking in with everybody, because I saw a lot of my job as making sure I knew what was going on. I’ve always told people to CC me on everything. I’ll tell you to stop if it gets to be too much. Whether I was a coordinator, supervisor, P.A. whatever. But, particularly as the post producer I’m like “please loop me into everything.” Even if it’s a drive on for somebody, I don’t care, just tell me.

For me the management aspect of it…. I think that you know the aspirational pie in the sky is to empower everybody to do their best you know whatever that may be. And so I think for me what that means is going around and actually listening to people and trying to leave my ideas about the schedule or any sort of agenda at the door. And just checking in and being like, “hey like how are things going? Do you think we’ll hit this deadline? Talk to me. Tell me what you think is realistic or what do you see as a hurdle.”

Gobler 

How did you learn to be that kind of manager? 

Danylevich 

That’s a good question. I think it sort of was something that I developed from being managed myself. So I learned what styles of management worked for me and which didn’t. As far as like when someone was managing me what makes me want to bring my best? Or what makes me super resentful? I didn’t want to be the latter. I didn’t want to be someone who came in and just said: “well it has to be this way, so I don’t care.” That’s not the kind of conversation I ever want to have with somebody. So I think it’s like just the idea that there’s certain ways I’d been managed in my life, whatever job it was, that really worked for me and others that didn’t. That’s also to say that it’s not about making my employees the happiest employees in the world because that’s not my responsibility. At the end of the day it’s about the show and we just have to do what we have to do to get it done. 

Gobler 

So what’s one thing that kind of inspired you as a manager? One kind of habit that a manager you worked for did that you were like “oh this is what I want to do.” 

Danylevich 

The thing that’s coming to mind is actually a manager who was the last manager I had at a restaurant job, the last restaurant job I held. I’d been unemployed for like eight months before hopping onto The Orville, but also had this restaurant job. And, I was waiting tables on the weekends and was getting totally burned out. And the manager recognized that. And he approached me and basically was like, “hey look like I understand that you’re doing what you need to do, but it’s having an impact on the people around you and the company as a whole. With how burned out you are, is this a good fit?” And I got super defensive at the time, but then went home thought about it and the next day I told him, “you know what you’re right. This isn’t good right now. This isn’t a good fit.” So, even though it was really scary and I felt like I really needed the income, I left the job because it wasn’t good for my health. And it was brought to my attention by this manager who I was pissed at, but at the same time I was like he was right, you know? And he didn’t make it personal. He was like, “look we’re running a business here. We have to make sure that we’re all in it together.

Gobler 

We could do the flip as well. What’s a bad experience that you had that you were like, “I never want to do that to someone.”

Danylevich 

I mean I had a lot of those. There was a boss that I worked for that never raged at me specifically, but he would storm down the hallways raging, cursing up a storm and it’s like suddenly you’re walking on eggshells the whole time. And then there was another person, that I had worked for early on, that when I’d bring him concerns I had he would always brush them off even when they were very valid. And not only was it disrespectful but it also was kind of ignorant not to listen to people around you that may see things that you don’t.

Gobler 

So let’s talk about people management a little bit. How did you learn those skills? First off, describe a little bit about when the light bulb went off like, “oh there’s a people management component to this job that maybe I need to bulk up my skills on, or be more aware of.” 

Holt 

Some people are born innately as nurturers and then a lot of it comes from experience. I think every job I’ve ever had up until now is still a learning experience: what can I learn about this person? And the more personalities you work with, the more you get to learn. And then the longer you’re in this business, you know how you want to be treated yourself. You know what’s my path? What’s my career path? What bosses have I had that I like, don’t like, and for what reasons? Similar to parents. I think parenting is not too dissimilar. You learn from your parents what you like, and what you don’t like, and how you want to be treated. And you try to apply that to your kids. It’s very similar to working in the industry.

Gobler 

So would it be fair to say that you feel that your role as a supervisor is to understand the trajectory of people on your team and to help facilitate getting from where they are today to where they want to go, amongst other things? 

Holt 

Amongst other things. I say it depends on where you are. On the show level, yes but probably to a little lesser degree. If you’re managing someone on a show, it’s harder to do that because sometimes they’re freelance on that show and they might not be in that same company or realm forever. So if I have an AE on one show and I transition to another show, it might not be the same AE, so it’s a little bit more of a challenge to do that and try to look out for the big picture. When you know you’re going to be around people for a long period of time, that’s the number one challenge. When it’s on the short term, then what keeps me up at night is am I doing a good job communicating to them what the daily needs are, what the weekly needs are, what the monthly needs are, so that they’re not surprised. I’ve come to find everybody, because of those different personalities, will have a different reaction to different levels of stress and trying to mitigate surprises tends to help that tremendously.

Gobler 

What do you agonize most as a manager of people? 

Phelps 

I would say if people feel happy and respected. I want to make sure that people, whether it’s the bottom or the top, feel like everyone is giving them the best that they can and I don’t want anyone to feel unheard. 

Gobler 

Can you elaborate on that a little bit? What do you mean by feeling hurt? 

Phelps 

So, I think everyone has ideas. And a lot of times, you know what’s possible not possible. But, instead of cutting somebody off, I want to hear them out. I want to say “well, why do you want to do that? How do you achieve that?” And then, oftentimes, based on budget, I have to say “well, that’s not doable because of X Y and Z,” but I want to make sure that we’re addressing concerns by everyone and explaining why something is achievable, and why some things are not, so that way everyone has an understanding. As opposed to just, “no, you can’t do that.” 

Gobler 

For Post Supervisors or Post Coordinators, what are some of the more sticky conversations you have as a supervisor of those supervisors? 

Phelps 

I think the link between production and post can be really challenging and I’m a big proponent that anyone who works in post should work production and anyone that works production should spend some time in post. Oftentimes if somebody, whether it’s a coordinator or post supervisor, hasn’t worked in production they may have a harder time wrapping their heads around why something happened and why this came back the way it did. And, instead of working through it with production — like calling them up and saying, “hey, so I know that you guys shot this like this, and you know we can’t have that because of X Y and Z so let’s try to work through why that happened and how to prevent it in the future.” I think that’s what needs to happen as opposed to: “you shot this wrong don’t do it again.” So I think a phone call. That’s one of the things that I deal with a lot is trying to create the relationship between production and post. 

Gobler 

It’s like building a bridge as opposed to having an adversarial relationship. I experience that sometimes where, if something is back from the field, the first thing I like to do is to call the sound department, or the DP, and speak with them first, and then present it to the executives as a united front. Like, “this is what happened and just no finger pointing.” But it is hard. 

Phelps 

It is very, very hard. I’ve been in a situation where it’s very hard to understand but I think setting up the show and basically telling production: “here’s my cell phone, I want you to call me literally day or night. I don’t care if it’s 3 o’clock in the morning. I want to work through it with you right then, as opposed to after it’s all done. I feel like that really helps. And that goes a long way with production where they feel like, “OK post is on our side.”

Gobler 

What do you agonize over as a manager? 

Stevenson 

I think the biggest thing that is stressful to me is when you have someone that you’ve inherited as a worker whether it’s an assistant editor or a coordinator. Somebody that’s on the show before you, or you’ve had to hire them because of a nepotism hire, and that person doesn’t perform well. And I’ve had a situation with an assistant editor and also a PA where I couldn’t get them to do the job. I mean the PA was always on the phone. I couldn’t fire him because of the person that referred him. And I kept trying to coach him and this and that and he just was always, “huh? What?” And I tried to get him engaged. It was really hard.

The other thing I agonize over, I would say agonize, I don’t know if that’s the right word, but that’s frustrating, is sometimes we have a situation now with credits. Credits is always a big mess. I think credits should start in production and have all that stuff dealt with and get to post and then post finishes up the process but this is not the case — we keep getting all these notes that are coming in and that starts causing a problem. Other problems are with facilities getting the time you want if your show changes, like your schedule changes, then you can’t get the time you want, or you might lose your mixers. 

I mean I feel like if you have a good team you can manage any challenge. So I don’t feel like…. Are there any other examples of things that maybe you’ve had challenges with or agonized over yourself that I could relate to maybe? 

Gobler 

What you said very much resonates with me. I agonize over when I have assistants who don’t get it, or they don’t hustle as hard as they need to, and you try and you explain or whatever else. And when it doesn’t work out, sometimes when you have to let them go, it never feels good to me, because I always feel like, “well was there something more that I could have done?”

Stevenson 

Yeah.

When I set out to talk to fellow producers, I wanted to hear whether their experiences were similar to my own. What I learned was that despite having different entrances into the business, we all shared similar traits, like a knack for problem solving and a passion for editing. In Part 3 of this series we talk about Resumes, Hiring and the future of post production.

Liz Lipschultz contributed to this interview.